Wayne State University

Aim Higher

Nurse-Midwife

Welcome to WSU College of Nursing’s Nurse-Midwifery website! We are delighted to assist you in learning more about this exciting profession. For questions or further information, please contact Mr. Robert Hellar in the Office of Student Affairs at ac4659@wayne.edu or (313) 577-4119.

Our nurse-midwifery concentration prepares certified nurse-midwives (CNM) with advanced skills and education to practice in a collaborative health care environment and provide safe, satisfying, comprehensive and individualized care to women and newborns. Our nurse-midwife graduates contribute to the profession through clinical practice, service, research, scholarship and education.

Upon successful completion of the concentration, our graduates are awarded either a Master’s of Science in Nursing (MSN), Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) or a post-graduate certificate.The MSN and post-graduate certificate curriculum incorporate content based on the ACNM Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice (ACNM, 2012), ACNM Standards of Practice (ACNM, 2012), AACN Essentials (AACN, 2006) and the Nursing Task Force standards (NTF, 2008). The DNP program curricula incorporates professional standards and guidelines including The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice (AACN, 2006) and the Criteria for Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Programs (NTF, 2008).  Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are eligible to take the national American Midwifery Certification Board examination.

The WSU nurse-midwife concentration has excellent statistics-the first time AMCB overall pass rate is 97% (the national rate is 88-90%).  The excellent two-year attrition rate for qualified students who have enrolled in the nurse-midwife clinical courses is 0.

Please click here for a sample Plan of Work.

The Nurse-Midwife program is fully accredited by the ACNM Accreditation Commission for Midwifery Education (ACME) (formerly ACNM Division of Accreditation), 8403 Colesville Road, Suite 1550, Silver Spring, MD 20910-6374; Tel: 240-485-1800, http://www.midwife.org/acme, acme@acnm.org.

Midwifery Care Components

Nurse-midwife students learn to actively involve women and their families in making choices that optimize health and wellness.  This model of care is based upon a fundamental respect for cultural and lifestyle choices as well as the individuality, spirituality and dignity of every woman and family. Physiological and developmental processes are supported through clinical care, education, and the appropriate use of technology and healthcare resources. 

Comprehensive health care provided by CNMs includes:

  • primary care
  • reproductive health care
  • pregnancy related care (prenatal care)
  • labor, birth and postpartum care
  • newborn care
  • well-woman health care
  • care of women with health and pregnancy related problems.

Mission and Philosophy of the Nurse-Midwife Concentration

The mission and philosophy of the midwifery concentration were developed with input from the nurse-midwife faculty and are integral to the midwife concentration and curriculum:

Nurse-Midwife Concentration Mission
The mission is to prepares competent nurse-midwives with advanced skills and education who practice in a collaborative environment and provide safe, satisfying, comprehensive and individualized care to women throughout their life span and newborns within the context of their families and communities. The nurse-midwife graduate will contribute to the profession through clinical practice, service, research, scholarship and education.

Nurse-Midwife Concentration Philosophy
The nurse-midwife concentration educates nurse-midwives who will provide comprehensive health care services throughout women’s lives and during the newborn period. Comprehensive health care includes primary care, reproductive health care services, pregnancy related care, newborn care, as well as women’s health and pregnancy related problems. Students learn to actively involve women and their families in making healthful choices that optimize health and wellness. This model of care is based upon a fundamental respect for cultural and lifestyle choices as well as the individuality, spirituality and dignity of every woman and family. Physiological and developmental processes are supported through clinical care, education, and the appropriate use of technology and healthcare resources.
Learning is conceptualized as a collaborative process based upon the principles of adult learning, mutual respect, intellectual curiosity and a commitment to excellence. Students learn to think critically and to be self-directed, while taking full advantage of the resources of the faculty, clinical sites, the College of Nursing and the University. Students learn through coursework and clinical experiences that include science and evidence as well as the art and aesthetics of practice. The faculty welcome the opportunity to foster the student’s growth and development while also supporting each person’s need to maintain a personal life and sense of humor. The concentration curriculum also emphasizes the unique challenges of urban life as well as fosters the student’s potential for leadership in the profession. This philosophy provides the foundation for the concentration as we strive to prepare highly qualified, culturally sensitive nurse-midwives who will promote optimum health for mothers, babies and families.

Objectives of the Nurse-Midwife Concentration

At the completion of the program, graduates of the nurse-midwife concentration will be able to:

 

  1. Demonstrate competence in the clinical practice of midwifery as characterized by the Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice 2012 (American College of Nurse Midwives, 2012) 
  2. Practice collaboratively within the health care system while providing primary care to women and newborns
  3. Use midwifery knowledge, innovation, creativity and cultural competence to adapt health care interventions based on the interrelationships among person, environment and health; 
  4. Analyze current knowledge for midwifery practice, evaluate effectiveness of health care interventions and use evidence-based care in clinical practice; 
  5. Engage in scholarly activity to advance knowledge in women’s health, newborn and midwifery care and collect accurate and clinical practice data/statistics; and 
  6. Provide leadership in women’s health care through active involvement in professional organizations, clinical teaching, and political awareness/involvement.

Preparation for entering the Nurse-Midwife Concentration

Graduate midwifery education builds on baccalaureate nursing education and nursing practice. Specific areas upon which midwifery graduate education builds and are not repeated at the graduate level include: basic anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology, introductory pharmacology, basic growth and development, basic physical and psychosocial assessment, basic knowledge of research and statistics, interviewing and development of therapeutic relationships and community health nursing.


Experience as a Registered Nurse in the labor and delivery setting, is not a requirement of the WSU Nurse-Midwife concentration but is strongly recommended

FAQs

How long is the program?

The MSN nurse-midwife concentration is a sequential 6-semester, full-time graduate program of study consisting of 48 credit hours including more than 600 hours of clinical experience. A 9-semester, part-time program of study is another option.

The BSN to DNP program takes from 4-5 years of full-time study.

The post-graduate certificate program for those who are already nurse practitioners requires two-three semesters, depending on the type of previous clinical experiences.

Please click here for a sample Plan of Work.

What is the typical class size?

Class sizes for the clinical courses range from 5-15 students. We currently have 7 students in the midwifery clinical group.

Can I continue to work while I am in the program?

Yes, most of our students continue to work throughout the program. However, since the class and clinical work take priority, we recommend working part-time, if at all possible. The full-time Master’s program workload is intense but passes quickly—like a fast labor!

What are the faculty looking for in the goal statement?

We are looking for people who are passionate about women’s health care. Please describe your future plans and where you see yourself practicing as a CNM. The focus of our program is aimed toward working with underserved women in the urban area. How do you see yourself in relation to this aim?

Can I apply right out of my BSN program?

Yes!! We welcome your application. We encourage you to gain RN experience (hopefully in caring for women during labor and birth) while you are taking your Master’s core courses or DNP core courses. That way by the time you start your midwifery clinical courses, you will have gained experiences in being with women and in working in the health care environment.

If I don’t have Labor and Delivery experience, how can I prepare for the midwifery clinical courses?

A solid background of Labor and Delivery nursing experience is a great help, but not required. The needs of students who do not have a strong L&D background will be assessed on an individual basis with the midwifery faculty and a plan to gain relevant experience will be developed jointly between the student and the faculty.

In general, we recommend the following for those with little or no Labor and Delivery nursing experience to prepare you to have the best experience possible in the second clinical course (NUR 7226):

Required experiences: The following are prerequisites that midwife students without or with very little L&D nursing experience must complete before beginning the second clinical course, NUR 7226:

  1. Successfully complete a fetal heart rate monitoring course, including a final test/evaluation.
  2. Neonatal resuscitation course, including intubation.
  3. Shadow a Labor and Delivery RN or a nurse-midwife for five to ten births OR attend 5-10 births as a volunteer doula. At these births, be ‘with woman’ e.g. provide comfort measures and observe the progress of labor and the actions of the midwife. 
  4. Become competent at blood drawing.

Highly recommended experiences:

  • Attend a series of childbirth education classes.
  • Do a summer independent study with a nurse-midwifery preceptor or a L&D nursing preceptor. 
  • Attend “strip rounds” on an Obstetric unit.
  • Take a labor support/Doula course, and become a labor doula (highly recommended)
  • Read about midwifery. Some recommended books may be found at http://www.acnm.org/

What are the costs related to the clinical experiences?

Students are responsible for carrying their own liability insurance during the three clinical courses. Contemporary Insurance Services, the company that insures, CNMs and student midwives, currently charges between $500-$700 for a one year policy.

We estimate that student costs for textbooks and equipment will be approximately $250 to $500 for the three midwifery clinical courses.  Other incidental costs related to your clinical experiences such as gas, parking fees, bridge tolls etc. are also the student’s responsibility.